Sophie Court

I have always had an attraction for jewellery, even from a young age. I remember being fascinated by my mother and grandmothers jewellery and was constantly spending all my pocket money on new rings, bracelets, necklaces and earrings.

I graduated from the prestigious School of Jewellery in Birmingham’s famous Jewellery Quarter in 2012 where I completed a BA (Hons) in Jewellery and Silversmithing.

I attended my first Trade Show in 2014 at the British Craft Trade Fair in Harrogate. I am very excited to say I won ‘Best Fashion Accessory Award 2014’ awarded from Attire Accessories Magazine. I have also been awarded Crafts Maker of the year 2014-2015 from Southern Voice Magazine.

What makes a piece of jewellery for me is knowing that it is unique. This is my objective to my jewellery. Every piece I make is a one off. I choose unusual, handmade papers to layer together. I laser cut the paper along with acrylic. I like mixing traditional materials with contemporary ones. I finish all my pieces with a Sterling Silver chain or earring backs.

Every necklace and bracelet charm is reversible which makes it suitable for many different occasions and outfits. My designs are simple and versatile and can enhance any outfit.

Kate Wilkinson

Having trained at Bradford Art College, Loughborough College of Art and Design and then finally completing an MA at The Royal College of Art  in 1996, I set up a studio in London with the help of the 1000th Crafts Council Setting Up Grant. I have been making mixed media jewellery for twenty years and now work from my garden studio in Buckinghamshire .I joined the OCG in 2016 and was delighted to be awarded runner up in the Guild Prize at the Christmas Woodstock Exhibition.

My jewellery is very much material and process led, I experiment at the bench and gather ideas whilst making endless sample units. These generally silver units then form the basis of a collection and vary in size, colour, texture and the order in which they are combined together with other materials such as semi precious beads, coloured acrylics and cork.

Texture plays a key role in my work and I emboss the silver with a variety of materials, the humblest of which often gives the most surprisingly delicate surface. In my FRAGMENT series I use fabrics that hold precious memories, I make up a patchwork of small textured silver pieces in to a larger panel which is then hung from a torque style necklace made of beautiful climbing cord, trying to make something strong and more permanent out of a fleeting moment.

ADELPHA rose from the simple notion that they are all” born of the same womb”, a simple leaf shape with a twist made using an adapted tool and a simple repetitive movement which can then be soldered together in patterns both geometric and random, varying scales and surfaces this is an ongoing collection that I return to again and again. Recently I have been adding very small detailed settings of coloured cork which add a gem like feature.

LUNA is my new work which I am eager to explore further. Here I am using the flattering combination of silver and cork to form  pure half moon shapes with coloured cork inserts. I have always liked the juxtaposition of unexpected materials in jewellery and the use of the soft but strong cork and hard silver is a satisfying combination to work with.

 

Valerie Mead

My jewellery is made of silver with touches of warm rose gold. My designs are often inspired by observations of architectural details and man made artefacts. My aim is to make easily wearable elegant contemporary jewellery with clean and simple lines. I lightly texture the silver surfaces and add tiny rose gold rivets and wires to highlight the design and add relief and colour. I also use freshwater pearls and stones. I enjoy making individually designed jewellery to commission and work in gold, silver and a variety of stones, for customers visiting my workshop, e.g. engagement and wedding rings and other special occasion pieces.

I studied Jewellery and Silversmithing at Sheffield Poly followed by a Goldsmiths’ Company Graduate Apprenticeship and a residency at South Hill Park Arts Centre in Berkshire. I moved to the Edith Road Workshops in 1984. I have shown work in many exhibitions including Dazzle and the Goldsmiths’ Fair and sell through galleries around the UK.

I have pieces in several national collections, including Green College Oxford, Sheffield Assay Office and the National Museum of Scotland. I take part in Oxford Artweeks and have a Christmas workshop exhibition. I teach jewellery design at Oxford and Cherwell Valley College.

I have been a member of OCG for 26 years.

Victoria Goddard

My jewellery making began initially because I was bored of  mass production so I wanted to make something different for myself. Other people began to show an interest and started to ask for commissions.

I mainly worked with gems and threading and beading, I decided I wanted to branch out more and get into working with silver. I then joined JASSO (http://www.jasso.org.uk/) jewellery and silversmiths Oxford where I began working in silver, I had got the bug and decided to go to study jewellery making in Italy for a course at a school in Florence for 8 months, Metallo Nobile, (http://www.metallo-nobile.com/en/index.php). It was an amazing experience living and learning in the center of Florence surrounded by Artisans and inspiration. Back In England I continued to Study and attended Courses at Holts Academy of jewellery London (http://www.holtsacademy.com/#7) for jewellery manufacture and CAD design, I continue to go to go JASSO and work from home in my studio working on new collections and commissions, I also teach and have private students.

My latest collection and project for 2019 is to make a new Japanese collection based on Wabi Sabi, beauty in imperfection. I will  use an ancient technique called Nunome Zogan,meaning weave inlay. It uses ancient techniques using Japanese alloys and preparations. The metal is cleaned with magnolia charcoal an then chiseled to make a texture like material and finally inlayed with pure gold and silver and then boiled in a Japanese patina.  The images of the ginko leaves and wabi sabi falling leaves are some examples,more images can be found on my instagram.

Rose Hallam

I paint wood, paper and card, and use photomontage, to make highly original jewellery. Colour and detail are essential to the work, which is both abstract and traditional in design. My beads are handmade from decorated card, and photos, each is hand rolled and has over ten coats of lacquer, leaving it highly durable and light to wear. The earring and necklace findings are sterling silver. I work with the seasons, and colours change throughout the year. I am an exhibiting member of the Oxfordshire Craft Guild, and sell my work through galleries and shops in Oxfordshire and beyond. My work has been selected for International Design competitions, Wherever I sell my work I use images that reflect the area. In Cornwall the sea often features, whereas in Oxford it may be images of the river such as punts, and houseboats. Stained glass windows from local churches are regularly used. I take commissions, including those that celebrate a special event, holiday, or occasion. A photograph supplied by the customer can be transformed into a personalised and highly original piece of jewellery whether it is cufflinks, a brooch, necklace or earrings.

Sara Withers

I have been designing and making jewellery for many years. My work concentrates on the use of unusual materials – either self made from Polymer or Resin, recycled items or interesting beads and buttons.

I have sold my work at events such as Art in Action and the Craft in Focus shows. My work is sold in a selection of shops, galleries and museums throughout Britain.

In 2019 I am part of the museum shop at Two Temple Place for the John Ruskin – The Power of Seeing exhibition.

I am the author or coauthor of about ten books of bead jewellery projects.  The most recent are ‘The Encyclopedia of Wire Jewellery Techniques’ and ‘A Compendium of Jewellery Making Techniques’.

I teach bead making and jewellery making in several arts centres, amongst them West Dean College and the Oxford Summer School. Another of my bead related interests is the Arkell bead collection in the Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford, which I lectured about at the last International Bead Convention in Istanbul.

 

 

 

 

 

Selma Stagg

I am based in Chipping Norton, a small Cotswold town in Oxfordshire, England where I work from my studio at home. I was born in Sarajevo, Bosnia in 1961 where I graduated in Civil Engineering. I moved to England and studied Art, Design and Ceramics at Windsor College. I have been a member of the Oxfordshire Craft Guild since 2002.

I chose porcelain as the major material for my jewellery because of its unique qualities of strength and light weight. I use vibrant colours as an integral part of my designs. Each "stone" is individually shaped and moulded by hand, dried slowly and fired in an electric kiln to a dense, hard, non-porous finish. Five (or more) layers of glaze are applied by brush to both sides of the "stones" and they are fired to the glaze temperature on ceramic wires. Large, silver components are made from PMC (Precious metal clay) which is 99% pure silver.

I assemble the porcelain "stones" into the finished article by combining them with semi-precious beads and sterling silver.

Pauline Payne

I am a freelance designer-jeweller having studied at Portsmouth College of Art and Design. I gained a number of prestigious awards for my jewellery work, including two Royal Society of Arts Commendations and I won the National Platinum Award. Working in gold and silver every piece is individually made, some set with semi-precious stones, ranging from earrings to bridal head-dresses. Much of my jewellery is inspired by natural forms and is characterised by the contrasting use of different textures.

I will also take on private commissions, making jewellery for all occasions.

I teach silver jewellery in various workshops throughout the year, including Denman College, The Oxford Summer School and Urchfont Manor.

Kate Coker

I am a designer jeweller based in Wallingford, South Oxfordshire. I studied jewellery design at the Berkshire College of Art and spent some time at Central St Martins in London in the early nineties. I also won the World Gold Council Student Design Competition in 1992. My jewellery is individually handmade in silver and gold and much of my work is oxdized to turn the silver a beautiful grey/black colour. I also try to find semi-precious beads and stones to compliment this unusual finish. Inspiration for my work comes from my love of the outdoors – the beautiful oxfordshire countryside around me and my love of the coast. My aim is to create beautifully made, individual but wearable pieces of art!

Kirstie Reynolds

I am a jewellery designer maker based in Banbury, Oxfordshire who specialises in jewellery made with silver clay. After graduating from Loughborough University with a first class honours degree in 1998, I travelled in extensively before setting up my studio in 1999. Whilst jewellery is my passion, my original background was in ceramics and this has been the perfect foundation for my venture into a malleable form of silver otherwise known as silver clay or precious metal clay (pmc). Silver clay is a revolutionary material that challenges any preconceptions about how precious metals must be worked. It is a mixture of microscopic particles of pure silver suspended in a non-toxic binder to create a pliable material similar to clay. It is fired in a kiln like regular clay to burn off the water and binder leaving us with 99.9% pure Silver. My hallmark is therefore 999 and as a result of its purity, it can be worn by people normally sensitive to sterling silver! Stones set into jewellery items are all laboratory grown to mimic natural stones and are fired in the kiln with the silver clay. Stones available are Cubic Zirconium, Yellow/Pink/Blue Topaz, Sapphire, Tanzanite and Ruby.